Author: Nicole Breault

4/26 Wednesday Workshop with Nathan Braccio

“Describing English/Algonquian Space/Place: Using Historical Maps, GIS, and Spatial Theory”

Nathan’s workshop will consider the challenges and rewards of a spatial approach to the history of 17th-century New England through the discussion of three different kinds of maps: English maps, Algonquian maps, and Historians’ maps. While all important, each of the maps lend themselves to different kinds of analysis and different pitfalls.

Please plan on attending and joining in the conversation with Nathan. We will meet as usual in the Wood Hall basement lounge. We will get started at our customary time of 12:15 p.m.

4/7 Foreign Policy Seminar

David Mayers
Boston University

“After Armageddon: International Society and the United States, 1945-1956”
 

Reception 4:30pm, Presentation 5:00pm

Contact Frank Costigliola (frank.costigliola@uconn.edu) if you wish to stay for the dinner following the talk ($12 for students, $20 for faculty)

Library Workshops 3/7 and 3/8

Omeka Workshop
March 7 at 11am in EC-1
This workshop will provide an overview of the Omeka tool.  Omeka allows users to build digital exhibitions and create simple web pages.  We will cover the basics of creating an Omeka account and adding items, collections, and exhibits.  This workshop is designed for the beginner and does not require any previous knowledge of Omeka.

 

GIS Workshop

March 8 at 3pm in EC-1
This workshop will introduce the basics of interactive web mapping using CartoDB, an open platform for data visualization.  It is a great tool for those who are interested in web mapping, but have no experience in web programming. You will learn how to upload various types of data, use filters, customize your map symbols and share a final online map. Perfect for beginners – no specific experience required.

 

If you’re interested in attending one of these workshops, please register at the following link: http://workshops.lib.uconn.edu/

3/8 Humanities in Action Panel and Discussion

HUMANITIES IN ACTION
Panel & Discussion with the Initiative on Campus Dialogues (ICD)
Wednesday, March 8, 2:00-3:30
Humanities Institute (4th floor, Babbidge Library)

We have three History Department faculty!
This panel gathers scholars who have brought their knowledge and humanities perspectives to collaborative community activities. Such public opportunities bring scholars and community members together with research and popular practices, and open new questions both in and out of the academy. They are important avenues for engaging, disseminating, and enriching all our knowledge.

Panelists:
Shayla Nunnally, Associate Professor, Political Science & Africana Studies
She will discuss her work with others to expand research about and education opportunities for women and girls of color.

Mark Overmyer-Velázquez, Associate Professor, History and Director of El Instituto
He will be speaking on detention and deportation activism.

Fiona Vernal, Associate Professor, History
She will discuss her local public history projects with Caribbean communities in the greater Hartford area.

Chris Vials, Associate Professor, English and Director of American Studies
He will speak about labor organizing in and out of the academy.

Manuela Wagner, Associate Professor, Literatures, Cultures & Languages and Director of German Language and Culture Program
She will discuss her collaborations with K-12 teachers and graduate students.

Mark Kohan, Assistant Clinical Professor, Neag School of Education and English Language Arts
He will speak about community collaborations for multicultural education.

Melanie Newport, Assistant Professor, History
She will speak about her efforts regarding prison education.

Facilitator:
Aimee Loiselle, Ph.D. Candidate, History
She has worked in alternative and community education for many years, bringing an intersectional approach to teaching and mentoring in programs with low-income, underrepresented, and adult basic education (ABE) students.

3/6 Career Pathways Event

In the latest event in our Career Pathways series, Marla Miller of UMass will be speaking on “Artisans and Entrepreneurs in the 21st Century Humanities: Graduate Education as Maker-Space” on Monday, 6 March, 12pm-1:15pm, UCHI Conference Room, 4th Floor, Babbidge Library.

At 4pm, we will have a Career Pathways roundtable on “Public History at Multiple Scales”, featuring Marla Miller, Bea Gurwitz of the National Humanities Alliance, and our own Nick Hurley in the Wood Hall Basement Lounge.

Both these events are co-sponsored by the Department of History, the Humanities Institute, and a Career Diversity Grant from the American Historical Association.

Encounters, A New Discussion Series

The Hartford History Center at Hartford Public Library, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, and the University of Connecticut’s Humanities Institute, are launching a community engagement partnership with a new discussion series called Encounters. The partners will provide discussion leaders to engage in topics aimed at strengthening our ability to know ourselves and one another through respectful and challenging dialogue. This February and March, Encounters will focus on the fundamental documents that define our democracy.

go to the full article

2/8 Career Pathways Event

Brown Bag Event
Wednesday, February 8
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
12:15-1:30pm

Kay Gruder from the Center for Career Development will be doing a presentation on using “The Versatile Ph.D.” website. Kay is a specialist in helping graduate students at the Center for Career Development, and getting to know her, as well as this valuable subscription website, will be helpful to all.

This site is a valuable on-line tool for graduate students considering careers outside traditional academic settings. https://versatilephd.com/
 
The Career Pathways Series is supported by an AHA Career Diversity Grant, the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, and the Department of History.

12/5 Career Pathways Event

“Digital Pathways in History”

Lecture
UConn Humanities Institute Conference Room
Babbidge Library, 4th floor
1:00-2:15pm

Dan Cohen
“The Digital Public Library of America and the History Around Us”
 
Dr. Cohen is the founding Executive Director of the Digital Public Library of America, which is bringing together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and making them freely available to the world. Until 2013, he was Professor of History in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University and the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. He is co-author of Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), author of Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007), and co-editor of Hacking the Academy (University of Michigan Press, 2012).
 

Career Pathways Roundtable
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
4:30pm

Speakers:
Dr. Cohen, (Ph.D. Yale University), Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Sara Georgini, (Ph.D. Candidate, Boston University), Assistant Editor, The Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society
Professor Tom Scheinfeldt (D.Phil., Oxford University), Associate Professor of Digital Media and Design and Director of Digital Humanities in the Digital Media Center, UConn
Sara Sikes, UConn University Archives, Special Collections & Digital Curation, Scholarly Communications Design Studio Coordinator

Light refreshments will be served from 4-4:30. The roundtable will begin at 4:30.

11/28-11/29 Gender and History Series

Gender & History Series
 
Juliana Barr, Associate Professor, Duke University
Author of the prize-winning book Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands.
 
Monday, November 28, 4:30pm
Konover Auditorium, Thomas J. Dodd Center
Lecture: “War Came in the Form of a Woman: Spanish Saints and Demons in the American Southwest”
Reception to follow
 
Tuesday, November 29, 10:00-11:30am
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
Workshop: “La Dama Azul” (The Woman in Blue): An Origin Story for Colonial America, as told from an Indian Perspective”