Manisha Sinha

Ph.D, ColumbiaProfessor Manisha Sinha, History Department, University of Connecticut
Draper Chair in American History

Office Hours, Fall 2017: Wed 10-11am and by appointment
Office: Wood Hall, Rm 219
Phone: (860) 486-2253
Fax: (860) 486-0641
Email: manisha.sinha@uconn.edu

 

Areas of Specialty

Early American, Southern, and African American History, Transnational Histories of Slavery, Abolition, and Feminism, United States Political History, the History and Legacy of the Civil War and Reconstruction

 

Biography

Manisha Sinha is professor and the James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History. She was born in India and received her Ph.D from Columbia University where her dissertation was nominated for the Bancroft prize. She was awarded the Chancellor’s Medal, the highest honor bestowed on faculty and received the Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award in Recognition of Outstanding Graduate Teaching and Advising from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she taught for over twenty years. Her recent book The Slave’s Cause was reviewed by The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Review of Books, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, The Atlantic, and The Boston Globe, among other newspapers and journals. It was featured as the Editor’s Choice of the New York Times Book Review. It was named the book of the week by Times Higher Education in May, 2016 to coincide with its UK publication and one of three Great History Books for 2016 in Bloomberg News. Her first book, The Counterrevolution of Slavery, was named one of the ten best books on slavery in Politico in 2015. In 2017, she was named one of Top Twenty Five Women in Higher Education by the magazine Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.

Sinha’s research interests lie in United States history, especially the transnational histories of slavery and abolition and the history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. She is a member of the Council of Advisors of the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg, New York Public Library, co-editor of the “Race and the Atlantic World, 1700-1900,” series of the University of Georgia Press, and is on the editorial board of the Journal of the Civil War Era. She has written for The New York Times, The New York Daily News, Time Magazine, CNN, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and The Huffington Post and been interviewed by The Times of London, The New York Times, Smithsonian Magazine, The Boston Globe, Slate, The Daily Caller, and Gothamist. She appeared on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show in 2014. She was an adviser and on-screen expert for the Emmy nominated PBS documentary, The Abolitionists (2013), which is a part of the NEH funded Created Equal film series. She is currently writing a book on Reconstruction under contract with Basic Books.

 

Selected Publications
Books

The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016)

  • Frederick Douglass Book Prize, Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, Yale University
  • Avery O. Craven Award for Best Book on the Civil War Era, Organization of American Historians
  • Best Book Prize, Society of Historians of the Early American Republic
  • James A. Rawley Award for the Best Book on Secession and the Sectional Crisis published in the last two years, Southern Historical Association
  • National Book Award for Non Fiction, Long List
  • Honorable Mention in the U.S. History category for the American Publishers Awards for Professional & Scholarly Excellence (PROSE)

Co-authored, The Abolitionist Imagination (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012)

Co-edited, Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race and Power in American History (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007)

Co-edited, African American Mosaic: A Documentary History from the African Slave Trade to the Twenty First Century Vol. I To 1877 & Vol. II From 1865 to the Present (Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2004) 

The Counterrevolution of Slavery:  Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000)

  • Finalist, Avery O. Craven Award for Best Book on the Civil War Era, Organization of American Historians
  • Finalist, George C. Rogers Award for Best Book on South Carolina History

 

Selected Awards and Accolades

Top 25 Women in Higher Education and Beyond, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, March 9, 2017

Elected Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 2017-

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, Massachusetts Historical Society, 2016-2107

Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award in Recognition of Outstanding Graduate Teaching and Advising, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2016

Exceptional Merit Award, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2013

Chancellor’s Medal and Distinguished Faculty Lecture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2011

Howard Foundation Fellowship, Brown University, 2009-2010

Faculty Fellowship, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, 2007-2008

Elected Member, American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 2006-

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, 2004-2005

Appointed to Distinguished Lecture Series, Organization of American Historians, 2003-

Research Grant, American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 1999

Rockefeller Post Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1994-95

Post-Doctoral Fellowship, W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research, Harvard University, 1993-94

Mrs. Giles Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities, Columbia University, 1992-93