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2/8 Career Pathways Event

Brown Bag Event
Wednesday, February 8
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
12:15-1:30pm

Kay Gruder from the Center for Career Development will be doing a presentation on using “The Versatile Ph.D.” website. Kay is a specialist in helping graduate students at the Center for Career Development, and getting to know her, as well as this valuable subscription website, will be helpful to all.

This site is a valuable on-line tool for graduate students considering careers outside traditional academic settings. https://versatilephd.com/
 
The Career Pathways Series is supported by an AHA Career Diversity Grant, the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, and the Department of History.

12/5 Career Pathways Event

“Digital Pathways in History”

Lecture
UConn Humanities Institute Conference Room
Babbidge Library, 4th floor
1:00-2:15pm

Dan Cohen
“The Digital Public Library of America and the History Around Us”
 
Dr. Cohen is the founding Executive Director of the Digital Public Library of America, which is bringing together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and making them freely available to the world. Until 2013, he was Professor of History in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University and the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. He is co-author of Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), author of Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007), and co-editor of Hacking the Academy (University of Michigan Press, 2012).
 

Career Pathways Roundtable
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
4:30pm

Speakers:
Dr. Cohen, (Ph.D. Yale University), Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Sara Georgini, (Ph.D. Candidate, Boston University), Assistant Editor, The Adams Papers, Massachusetts Historical Society
Professor Tom Scheinfeldt (D.Phil., Oxford University), Associate Professor of Digital Media and Design and Director of Digital Humanities in the Digital Media Center, UConn
Sara Sikes, UConn University Archives, Special Collections & Digital Curation, Scholarly Communications Design Studio Coordinator

Light refreshments will be served from 4-4:30. The roundtable will begin at 4:30.

11/28-11/29 Gender and History Series

Gender & History Series
 
Juliana Barr, Associate Professor, Duke University
Author of the prize-winning book Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands.
 
Monday, November 28, 4:30pm
Konover Auditorium, Thomas J. Dodd Center
Lecture: “War Came in the Form of a Woman: Spanish Saints and Demons in the American Southwest”
Reception to follow
 
Tuesday, November 29, 10:00-11:30am
Wood Hall Basement Lounge
Workshop: “La Dama Azul” (The Woman in Blue): An Origin Story for Colonial America, as told from an Indian Perspective”
 

Benton Museum to Display Shakespeare’s ‘First Folio’ in 2016

[From UConn Today 3/2/2015]

UConn has been selected as a host site for a national traveling exhibition in 2016 for “First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare.”

Title page of Shakespeare's First Folio, published in 1623. Image courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library.
Title page from “First Folio” — the first collected edition of William Shakespeare’s plays published in 1623. (Courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library)

The “First Folio” is the first collected edition of William Shakespeare’s plays published in 1623 by two of his fellow actors, seven years after the Bard’s death. The collection includes 18 plays that would otherwise have been lost, including “Macbeth,” Julius Caesar,” “Twelfth Night,” “The Tempest,” “Antony and Cleopatra,” “The Comedy of Errors” and As You Like It.” The exhibition will take place in the Gilman Gallery at the William Benton Museum of Art in Storrs.

The tour is a partnership between The Folger Shakespeare Library, Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association and will be hosted by one institution in all 50 states, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico to mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s passing.

For the full story, please visit the original UConn Today article.

 

3/11 – American Antiquarian Society Seminar: “The Nature of the South”

Richard Lyman Bushman, Gouverneur Morris Professor of History Emeritus at Columbia UniversityRichard Lyman Bushman

Gouverneur Morris Professor of History Emeritus, Columbia University
2015 Scholar-in-Residence at the American Antiquarian Society

Wednesday, March 11 – 5:30pm in the Wood Hall Basement Lounge

Reception and refreshments begin at 5pm

Prof. Bushman’s current research focuses on “Farmers in the Production of the Nation: Family Agriculture in Eighteenth-Century America.” He is well known for books such as From Puritan to Yankee: Character and the Social Order in Connecticut, 1690-1765 (1967), King and People in Provincial Massachusetts (1985), The Refinement of America: Persons, Houses, Cities (1992), and Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling (2005).

After the seminar, there will be a dutch-treat dinner gathering at the Oriental Café in Storrs. All those planning to attend the dinner please let Nina Dayton know in advance, so we have a headcount for the reservation.

Any questions? Contact cornelia.dayton@uconn.edu (faculty coordinator, History Department)

3/3 – “Gender and the Politics of Consumption and Labor in Cold War Chile and the United States”

The Gender and History Lecture Series Presents:

Heidi Tinsman, Professor of HistoryHeidi Tinsman, Professor of History, University of California - Irvine
University of California, Irvine

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

4:30 pm

Konover Auditorium, Dodd Center

Public reception to follow.

This event is free and open to the public.

Professor Heidi Tinsman’s work focuses on twentieth-century Latin American social history, gender history, and labor history. Her recent book, Buying into the Regime, is a transnational history of how Chilean grapes created new forms of consumption and labor politics in both the United States and Chile.

In addition, please join us in Wood Hall Basement Lounge for a workshop on a pre-circulated paper by Professor Tinsman from 10:00 to 11:30 am on Wednesday, March 4. Copies of the paper will be available in the History Department mail room, Wood Hall 117.

These events are co-sponsored by the History Department, El Instituto, and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program.

Anthony Grafton “Colonial American Readers and the Traditions of Latin Humanism” – January 22

Anthony Grafton, the Henry Putnam University Professor of History at Princeton University.The University of Connecticut Department of History’s Sixteenth Annual Fusco Distinguished Lecturer, Anthony Grafton (Henry Putnam University Professor of History, Princeton University) will be visiting the Department next Thursday, January 22, 2015.

Please join us in Wood Hall Basement Lounge for a Morning Workshop from 10:00 to 11:30 AM on Prof. Grafton’s pre-circulated paper: “Observation and Compilation in Renaissance Ethnography: Johannes Buxtorf Observes the Jews of Ashkenaz”. Copies of the paper are available in the History Department mail room, Wood Hall 117.

The Fusco Distinguished Lecture, “Colonial American Readers and the Traditions of Latin Humanism” will be at 4pm in Konover Auditorium, with a reception to follow.

Everyone is most welcome.

Allison Horrocks (PhD candidate) to give Benton Gallery talk, Tue 9/23

Gallery Talk: World War I on the Battlefield and in the Kitchen
Allison Horrocks
, PhD Candidate in History
Tuesday, September 23, 3:30pm
American men and women participated in World War I on the battlefield and in their kitchen cupboards. The war to “end all wars” entered foreign and domestic realms, ushering in new ways of engaging with the world and the food put on the dinner table. In addition to factory work, women were called to serve on the “homefront” through preservation and conservation. This talk will explore women’s various contributions to the war effort and their changing relationships to the state through the case of Connecticut Agricultural College, later the University of Connecticut.