Hilary Bogert-Winkler

Hilary Bogert-Winkler, PhD candidate, History Dept, UConnOffice: Wood Hall 305
Contact: hilary.bogert-winkler@uconn.edu

B.A., Western Kentucky University—Religious Studies and History, Asian Studies Minor
M.T.S., Harvard University—World Religions
M.A.R., Yale University—Religion and Literature

Advisor: Brendan Kane

Dissertation Title: “Prayerful Protest and Clandestine Conformity: Alternative Liturgies and the Book of Common Prayer in Interregnum England”

 

Research Fields:
Early Modern British and Irish History, Religious History, State Formation, Empire, Atlantic World, Late Medieval Britain, Ritual Studies, Paleography, Digital Humanities

 

Research Interests:
I study early modern British history, in particular the intersections of religion and politics from 1640-1660. My dissertation examines the ways that Church of England conformists coped with the proscription of the Book of Common Prayer from 1645-1660. In the absence of the Prayer Book liturgy, several conformists wrote alternative liturgies to use in its place. I argue that these liturgical authors use those forms of prayers not only to provide “correct” worship during the upheavals of the mid-seventeenth century, but also to level political critiques against the Commonwealth and Protectorate. More broadly, I am interested in longer views of the Reformation (in Britain, Ireland, and on the Continent), and how the debates and changes of the sixteenth century Reformation movements continued to take shape in the seventeenth century, particularly in tandem with early modern state formation and colonial projects.

 

Presentations:

2017 – “Re-reading the Revolution”: A Conference Launching Léamh: Learn Early Modern Irish. Co-organizer. University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.

2017 – “‘Too like the sons of Israel’: Royalism, Exile, and Israel during the Interregnum.” Northeastern Conference on British Studies, Beverly, Massachusetts.

2015 – “Ritual, Order, and Disorder during the Interregnum: The Evidence from the Prayer Book(s).” Early Modern History Workshop on Political History. North American Conference on British Studies, Little Rock, Arkansas.

2013 – “Tangled Up in the Big Blue: Atlantic History and the British Problem.” Northeastern Conference on British Studies, Storrs, Connecticut.

2011 – “Ending the ‘Desparate Frolicks in Religion:’ Defenses of the Book of Common Prayer, 1660-1662.”  Northeastern Conference on British Studies, Worcester, Massachusetts.

2011 – “Prayerful Protest: Alternative Liturgies and Theological Dissent in Interregnum England.”  University of Reading Early Modern Studies Conference, Reading, UK.


Awards, Fellowships, and Honors:

2014-2017 Bell Woolfall Fellowship, Virginia Theological Seminary.
2016 Political Thought in Times of Crisis, 1640-1660 Symposium, Folger Institute.
2015-2016 Draper Dissertation Fellow, University of Connecticut Humanities Institute.
2015 Research Grant, Historical Society of the Episcopal Church.
2015 Stern Grant, North American Conference on British Studies.
2011-2015 Pre-doctoral Fellowship, Department of History, University of Connecticut.
2013-2014 Researching the Archives Dissertation Seminar, Folger Institute.
2011-2014 Summer Research Fellowship, Department of History, University of Connecticut.
2013 Harry J. Marks Fellowship, Department of History, University of Connecticut.
2010-2013 Outstanding Scholars Program, University of Connecticut.
2011 Conference Travel Bursary, University of Reading (UK) Early Modern Research Centre.
2009 Thomas Phillips Memorial Award, Yale Divinity School.


Digital and Public Humanities:

2017-present   Graduate Assistant, Humility and Conviction in Public Life, University of Connecticut Humanities Institute.

2016-present   Convener, Early Modern Studies Paleography Group, University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, in conjunction with the Folger Institute’s Early Modern Manuscripts Online. https://emmo.folger.edu

2015-present   Research Assistant, Léamh: Early Modern Irish: a digital guide to reading and paleography, 1200-1650. www.leamh.org.

 

Languages:

French—reading proficiency.
Greek (Attic and Biblical)—reading proficiency.
Irish (modern)—elementary proficiency (currently enrolled in formal coursework).
Latin—reading proficiency.
Spanish—reading proficiency.